Maggie Ray: World War II Air Force Pilot

by Marsha J. Wright

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"Maggie Ray" inspires us to follow our dreams to new heights. It was wartime 1943. Many people thought women weren't capable of piloting military planes. In a daring move, young Maggie earned her pilot's license and responded to an invitation from Uncle Sam to join the Women Air Force Service Pilots, the WASP. One of America's first women Air Force pilots, Tom Brokaw paid tribute to this amazing woman, dedicating an entire chapter to her story in "The Greatest Generation." Now her daughter, author Marsha J. Wright, brings you the exciting inside story beginning when Maggie was ten through war's end.

ISBN 13: 978-0-9790446-8-7
ISBN 10: 0-9790446-8-5

Biography & Autobiography : Women
Juvenile Nonfiction : Transportation - Aviation Non-fiction/biography, aviation history
Juvenile Nonfiction : Biography & Autobiography – Women

Excerpt:

"Don’t quit now," pleaded the petite 5'4" brunette as the Bamboo Bomber lumbered through the skies over Washington D.C. A sudden vibration shook the aircraft. She shut down the left engine and increased fuel to the right. The engine's growl grew worse. With difficulty, she restarted the wind-milling left engine. Looking out the windows, she examined each wing carefully, fearful of leaking fuel. The canvas and plywood frame of the plane could ignite like tinder. The engine sputtered. Picking up the microphone, she reported, "This is Army two-four-six. I am losing altitude."

Now she was using all of her strength to control the wildly bucking aircraft. "Cleared to land," she heard, as the wheels touched down. To her horror, she saw gas pouring over the left engine.